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Soulful Branding

Soulful Branding

Soulful Integrated Branding Defined

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Soulful Integrated Branding Defined

Integrated Branding is the use of brand identity, personality, advertising, retail promotions & services, product design, print collateral, website and online marketing, etc. to make your target market associate your particular company with admirable character traits and core values.

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Soulful Branding

Soulful Branding

By

Soulful Branding

Most marketing teams operate in a “rationalist mindset,” dominated by spreadsheets, income statements, reams of market data and financial feasibility reports. Similarly, most MBA programs train future business managers primarily in the rationalist worldview, but if the rationalist worldview is the primary or the only tool for processing a brand’s reality, it will likely smother cultural insights and soulful activism that can otherwise enliven the brand field.

The soulful branding mindset invites us instead to think like a mystic, an author, composer or movie producer, and also as a provocateur and cultural activist. Brand developers should treat their medium just like a novel or film project, wherein the goal is to deliver provocative information that both responds to and also triggers innate and authentic human identity needs, not trivial or destructive ones.

This distinction is reflected in the contrast between knowledge and wisdom. Knowledge is that which the head alone knows, the pursuit of which is the focus of the sciences, while wisdom is grasped by both head and heart simultaneously, and thus authentic and soulful communication and learning is only present when both the head and the heart are engaged and processing experiences at the same time.

The great depth psychologist Carl Jung taught us about the nature of each individual’s soul journey by pointing out that the unconscious is a co-determining factor along with consciousness, and if we live in such a way that both the conscious and unconscious are understood and taken into account, then the personality’s center of gravity shifts from being only egocentric to the point between the conscious and unconscious minds where a new type of awareness dwells. Jung names this new center of deep consciousness the “Self,” while others have referred to this as the “Higher Self.” This is in contract to the lower-self, which is a construct only of the ego and rational mind.

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