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Brand Repositioning

Brand Repositioning

Success And Radical Brand Repositioning

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Brand Repositioning Abercrombie & Fitch Brand Strategy

Conventional brand repositioning wisdom is to alter the brand’s position incrementally from the established position, playing off of current assumptions about the brand. It is usually a very tricky and subtle exercise that requires deep customer insight. And yet, some brands have radically altered their brand’s meanings, so much so that the ‘before’ and ‘after’ target audiences are completely different.  Following are two examples of this.

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Brand Repositioning

Brand Strategy: Repositioning Commodities

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Brand Strategy Brand Positioning Frank Perdue

Even producers in the commodity world of meats and produce have found ways to reposition themselves and thus create a unique selling proposition. Their successful strategies can be summed up in five ways.

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Brand Repositioning

Brand Strategy: Repositioning A Competitor

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Brand Strategy Brand Repositioning Olive Oil

There are times, though rare, that a repositioning the competition strategy is not to hang a negative on them, but simply to put your lead competitor in its place—or, shall I say, in second place? This was the case in a project we did for the producers of Spanish olive oil.

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Brand Repositioning

Competitor Repositioning

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Brand Strategy Brand Repositioning Stolichnaya

In positioning your brand sometimes you discover there are no unique positions to carve out. In such cases I suggest repositioning a competitor by convincing consumers to view the competitor in a different way. Tylenol successfully repositioned aspirin by running advertisements explaining the negative side effects of aspirin.

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Brand Repositioning

Repositioning The Competition

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Brand Strategy Brand Repositioning Tylenol

This is a post about a very powerful marketing strategy that has fallen into disuse. Why? I have no idea, unless it’s about creative people thinking that it’s not creative. It’s called “repositioning the competition” and I, along with my ex-partner Al Ries, wrote about it in a book called, Positioning: The Battle For Your Mind.

In simple terms, to move a new idea or product into the mind, you must first move an old one out. “The world is round,” said Christopher Columbus. “No, it’s not,” said the public, “it’s flat.”

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